John Miles Foley, Founding Editor

The Oral Tradition Staff

John Zemke directs the Center for Studies in Oral Tradition and the Center for eResearch at the University of Missouri. He began his study of verbal arts with his training in medieval Spanish literature under Samuel G. Armistead. He teaches courses on Hispanic Oral Traditions, History of the Spanish Language, and medieval Spanish Literature at the University of Missouri. His 2004 book entitled Mose ben Barukh Almosnino. Regimiento de la vida y Tratado de los suenyos (Salonika, 1564) reflects interest in restoring Spanish language documents in Hebrew characters to the historical record.

John Miles Foley was the Founding Director of the Center for Studies in Oral Tradition and the Center for eResearch at the University of Missouri, where he served as W. H. Byler Chair in the Humanities and Curators Professor of Classical Studies and English. Among his recent books are Oral Tradition and the Internet: Pathways of the Mind (2012), How to Read an Oral Poem (2002), an edition and translation of The Wedding of Mustajbey's Son Bećirbey as Performed by Halil Bajgorić (2004), and A Companion to Ancient Epic (2005). For further information see his curriculum vitae.

Mark Jarvis, IT Manager for the Center for Studies in Oral Tradition and the Center for eResearch, is responsible for coordinating the two centers' various technical projects, both Web-based and otherwise. His interests include user interface design, digital video production, 3D graphics and animation, and non-linear storytelling.

Hannah Lenon serves as Administrative Assistant for both the Center for Studies in Oral Tradition and the Center for eResearch. Her interests include interstitial fiction and transformative works.

Justin Arft, Editorial Assistant, is a PhD candidate in Classical Studies and formerly earned his MA in Religious Studies at the University of Missouri with an emphasis in Gospel literature and questions of history and authorship in that tradition. His teaching and research interests are currently in Homer, the ancient Greek Epic Cycle, oral poetics, and studies in classical reception.

Anqi Du, Editorial Assistant, is a senior Broadcast Journalism student at the University of Missouri. She came to the U.S. from China in 2009. Her work includes translating Oral Tradition journal articles into Chinese and coordinating between the Center for Studies in Oral Tradition and Chinese Oral Tradition academies. Her interest area is cross-cultural communication.

Morgan Grey, Editorial Assistant, is a PhD candidate in the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Missouri. She is currently working on her dissertation on Ovid. Her research interests include Latin poetry and the reception on Classical literature.

Elizabeth Janda, Editorial Assistant, is a PhD candidate in the Department of Classical Studies and has an MA in Russian literature from the University of Virginia. She is currently interested in the reception of Latin poetry and the depiction of animals in antiquity.

Ruth Knezevich, Editorial Assistant, is a PhD student in the Department of English at the University of Missouri, with an emphasis in late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth-century British literatures. Her interests include the interplay between oral and written narratives and the canonization of traditional balladry across the British Isles.

Rebecca Richardson Mouser, Editorial Assistant, is a PhD candidate in the Department of English at the University of Missouri. She is working on her dissertation on Anglo-Saxon Oral Traditions as manifested in the fourteenth century alliterative poems of the Morte Arthure and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Her research interests include Old English poetry, the History of the English Language, and the alliterative poems of the fourteenth century.

Lori Garner, Associate Editor of Oral Tradition, is Assistant Professor of English at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee. She is the author of Structuring Spaces: Oral Poetics and Architecture in Early Medieval England (2011) and has published articles on medieval English poetry and oral traditions. Her current research focuses on Anglo-Saxon charms and remedies.

Scott Garner, Associate Editor of Oral Tradition, teaches in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies at Rhodes College, where he also serves as the director of the Fellowships Program through which he coordinates experiential learning opportunities for the college’s students. His research interests center around ancient Greek oral traditions, and he is the author of Traditional Elegy: The Interplay of Meter, Tradition, and Context in Early Greek Poetry (2011).

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